About Me

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Crete, Greece
Married to the lovely Geoffrey, my soulmate. I have two fantastic big kids,both married, whom I love and miss every day I'm not with them, but I know they're living and loving their lives and we make up for time when we get together.I now have three granddaughters too...

Sunday, 6 March 2011

A Walk to Milatos Cave....

We drove to Milatos Cave for our walk yesterday.
It's perched high above the hamlet of Milatos, which is on the north coast.
The caves are approximately 200 metres along an old footpath which winds
around the side of a steep ravine.
The sound from the grazing goats and assorted birds is truly magical, echoing through the ravine.
This is delicate white bryony, a poisonous climber.
The hillsides are covered in carob, sage, myrtle and euphorbia.

As we approach the cave entrance it seems unimpressive.
Inside though, it spreads out into a series of caves covering 2100 sq. metres.
In February, 1823, 2700 local inhabitants took refuge here, hiding from
the Turkish troops of Hassan Pasha. They were plundering and pillaging the area.
For 13 days. approximately 150 Cretan rebels fought off the Turks until, starving and desperate the beseiged tried to break out.
They were cut down and massacred by the Turks.
The children were sold into slavery in Egypt and 18 priests were burnt to death.
This church is inside the caves and was built to commemorate this event.
Bones from some of the dead can be seen in this glass-fronted ossuary.
One of the icons in the church.
When I was a member of The Rainbow Choir, we sang here at the commemoration that is held every May.
As we meandered back to the car, we reflected on how such a tragedy could have taken place in such a peaceful spot.

12 comments:

Cheryl said...

What a beautiful outing. Although the history is tragic, it's an amazing location. Thanks for sharing Jude. Have a nice Sunday. x

John said...

Wonderful photos and sad but intersting story.

Gareth said...

Good stuff Mum, I hope to join you there next year.

xx

Pondside said...

I could feel the warmth of the sun on the stones - what an incredible place to walk on a sunny afternoon.

Lynn said...

I am always so moved when I see historical spots like this where there was so much loss of life: Wounded Knee; Masada; come to mind. I almost feel like I can "feel" the "ghosts" of those who suffered.
Yes, it is a beautiful land. Too bad it had to be spoiled this way.

sea-blue-sky & abstracts said...

Nice to see the sun, can almost feel the warmth - what a sad story though. Man's inhumanity to Man....

Mousy Brown said...

What beautiful views and what a terrible history - must be amazing to be there and 'discover' what is hiding within....

Clare Wassermann said...

What a wonderful place. Peaceful, yet with such a tragic history

chris said...

I live near the caves and never tire of walking up to them, A sad but beautiful place x

Cait O'Connor said...

I would love to walk there, so warm and inviting in spite of the sad history.

Taz said...

What a fascinating but tragic place. Thanks for taking us along x

Jon the Jew said...
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